North Down July 2003

see also CCC archives http://www.cropcircle.tv/archives/2003/northdown/northdown2003a.html

This is a very interesting formation: No 'geometry', no obvious symbolism, - nothing really, except a remarkably complex ground lay.  (You will need to go into the CCC archives to really see it)  It is a fair  hike from a public road, about 1.5 km by the farm track or footpath, although quite close to the Ridgeway.

The formation comprised 501 small  'virtual circles', which have a central standing tuft, and are delineated by circular wedges shapes between the virtual circles. (see lower picture)

The number of circles in each ring increases approximately with circumference, but not exactly   In ring 10 there are actually fewer circles than in ring 9 (counting from centre out) .

I put out a 1000 challenge on the CCC forum for any circle makers to reproduce this, in barley, in one night.    I even offered to pay the farmer. I felt that my money was quite safe.

So far, no takers, but some 'regrets' from known 'circle makers' that they are too busy, or it is 'beneath them'. e.g:

"I do not see the point"  "working with you doesn't interest me" "This summer I agreed to participate in Sliding's project (as well as the BBC Mandelbrot challenge) for free,......I think you'll find that the majority of circlemakers here would rather see richard make his own circles than play the Aunt Sally. That said, I'm sure he'll find a suitable tart if he sets his sights low enough. "  (from a prominent member of circlemakers.org)

Having received no takers, I worked out my own construction plan, which would take around 16 man-hours, say 4 men for 4 hours. It seemed feasible. Accuracy in setting out would be vital, but not impossible.  So the challenge was withdrawn!

 

 

Table gives number of circles in each of the 11  rings. There are 501 small circles. Numerologists will note that with the 3 main circles, this gives 504.

I can find no obvious relationship between the sizes of the main circles - 100, 480, 543.

 

 

 

 

 

Photo acknowledgments to Lucy Pringle www.lucypringle.co.uk